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Faculty Member Sabine Gruffat in exhibition at Motorenhalle-Dresden

October 13, 2021

THE UPSHOT OF TRANS-AFFECTIVE SOLIDARITY

Act 1: Dismantling Individuality October 14, 2021 – March 6, 2022 MOTORENHALLE Centre for Contemporary Art Wachsbleichstraße 4a Dresden – Germany www.motorenhalle.de verein@riesa-efau.de Video evening: October 15 | 20:00 – 22:00 Participating artists: Mehraneh Atashi (Iran) | Evangelia Basdekis (Greece/UK) | Sabine Gruffat (USA) | Shon Kim (South Korea) | Marie-Claire Messouma Manlanbien (Ivory Coast) | Muriel Paraboni (Brazil) | Jhafis Quintero (Panama) & Johanna Barilier (Switzerland) | Ali Tnani (Tunisia) Curated by Kisito Assangni

THE UPSHOT OF TRANS-AFFECTIVE SOLIDARITY proposes to explore a new image of humanity capable of valorising solidarity and critical knowlegde coming from different contexts and cultures. The programme takes its title from what scholar Anne Garland Mahler calls “trans-affective solidarity” that relies on a metonymic color politics. An imagined transnational, transethnic, transracial, and translinguistic affective encounter in order to envision a more economically equitable, racially just, and human-centered world. The project presents work by 8 artists of diverse nationalities who provide an opportunity to reconsider how one can imagine another collective experience that would be capable of renewing our intersubjective ties in these uncertain times. THE UPSHOT OF TRANS-AFFECTIVE SOLIDARITY approaches its subject from a variety of perspectives, one of which involves the irresistible pull of intercultural meeting points and dreams around which people converge. Most of the works embrace a sense of reinvention and agency with the aim to shape various interpretative environments. They offer an expanded frame of reference that contributes to this heterogeneous engagement with video, film and the culture of solidarity these artists encapsulate. The programme is part of the exhibition Approximationen Derivate Surrogate curated by Denise Ackermann and Frank Eckhardt. About the curator: Kisito Assangni is a Togolese-French curator and consultant who studied museology at Ecole du Louvre in Paris. Currently living between UK, France and Togo, his research interests gravitate towards the cultural impact of globalisation, psychogeography and critical education. He investigates the modes of cultural production that combine theory and practice. He inherently aims at going beyond the usual relations between artist, curator, institution, audience, and artwork, in order to engage audiences in encounters with art that are unexpected, transformative, and fun. Assangni is heavily involved in video, performance, and experimental sound. His discursive exhibitions have been shown internationally, including at the Venice Biennale, ZKM Museum, Karlsruhe; Whitechapel Gallery, London; Centre of Contemporary Art, Glasgow; Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; Malmo Konsthall, Sweden; Torrance Art Museum, Los Angeles; Es Baluard Museum of Art, Palma, Spain; National Centre for Contemporary Arts, Moscow; Marrakech Biennale among others. Image: Eventide, Muriel Paraboni, 2016

Faculty member Sabine Gruffat juror and presenter at the Athens International Film and Video Festival

October 6, 2021

The Athens International Film + Video Festival
October 15-24, 2021
http://athensfilmfest.org/sabine-gruffat-in-person/

Back by popular demand, AIFVF returns this October with two years of incredible films. From October 15th – 24th, 2021 The Athens International Film and Video Festival (AIFVF) will present over 500 films in competition at the historic Athena Cinema in uptown Athens, OH. This year’s festival combines both the (originally postponed due to covid) AIFVF 2020 and AIFVF 2021 festivals and features an incredible array of special events and screenings.

AIFVF’s visiting artist lineup includes OU Film alumni and festival darling Tony Buba serving as the head of the documentary jury and presenting a selection of his works on Monday, October 18 at 7:00 PM. On Tuesday, October 19 at 7:15 PM, Amber Bemak and Nadia Granados, winners of AIFVF’s 2019 experimental top prize will present a solo program of their work revolving around queer love and loss, and the political ramifications of patriarchal, imperialist power. On Friday, October 22 at 7:30 PM, Sabine Gruffat will present her material driven works that cross analog and digital signals. Bill Brown will present a program of appropriated and reconfigured landscapes on Thursday, October 21, at 7:30 PM, with topics ranging from haunted houses and memorial architecture to outsider archaeology.

During the 10 days, over 40 feature length films and plethora of short films from across the globe will screen and compete in the annual festival with winners chosen by the independent jury, garnishing cash prizes and awards including Academy Qualifying status in select categories.

Founded in 1974, the Athens International Film + Video Festival has been presenting the best in international film for 48 years. Known globally as a festival that supports cinema from independent, underground, and marginalized populations, the AIFVF represents the values that we share as a community. It is a champion of justice and provides a voice for underrepresented artists and viewpoints on a global level. For over four decades, the AIFVF has embraced experimental, narrative, animation, short-form, feature length and documentary films from every corner of the globe. The Athens International Film + Video Festival is administered by The Athens Center for Film and Video, a project of the College of Fine Arts at Ohio University. This year’s festival takes place October 15-24, 2021, at the historic Athena Cinema in downtown Athens. The full schedule and ticket information is available at www.athensfest.org.

 

Faculty Member Sabine Gruffat Solo Exhibition at Winthrop University

September 23, 2021

September 13 – December 10, 2021
AntiBodies
Sabine Gruffat
Elizabeth Dunlap Patrick Gallery
Artist Talk: 09/27/2021 at 7PM

Sabine Gruffat’s AntiBodies is a virtual reality (VR) artwork and multimedia installation that explores body dysmorphia – a fixation on perceived flaws of one’s body – and gender and race representation in the context of eating disorders and self-image. By making the experience tactile and immediate through video, digital images and virtual reality, AntiBodies conveys the compulsive and anxious nature of body image issues and eating disorders while pointing to ways media and social pressures enforce unhealthy ideals. A French-American artist who was born in Bangkok, Thailand, Gruffat lived internationally in Saudi Arabia and Hong Kong before immigrating to the United States where she is currently a Professor of Digital Art at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

New African Studies Exhibition co-organized by faculty member Victoria Rovine

September 21, 2021

The African Studies Center presents
Vanessa Tembane
Existing in the Shadow
Online Exhibition: October 1-31

Special Event: In Dialogue: Vanessa Tembane & Professor Tanya Shields, Women’s and Gender Studies
Thursday, October 28: 4:30-5:30 pm

Vanessa Tembane (b. 1995) is a South African born artist, with Mozambican heritage, currently based in Johannesburg. Tembane holds a Master of Fine Arts. Tembane works primarily in collage and digital print media. Her work is inspired by her mother’s narratives and explores how they have influenced her identity and sense of belonging. Her collages allow her to merge her photographs that were taken in South Africa with those of her Mozambican relatives and to create strange hybridized composites. The collages combine photographic cut-outs with details of swathes of fabric – capulanas – that were given to Tembane by her grandmother and aunts during occasional visits to Mozambique. Tembane’s collages become a means of telling stories about her origins and what is in some sense an alternative “home” culture, albeit one she mostly experienced indirectly. They enable her to identify with her mother’s country of origin by constructing new imagined memories for herself, and through this, to achieve a sense of belonging.

Joy Drury Cox late summer 2021 studio update

September 7, 2021

Summer Reading

July 9 – September 18, 2021

Center for Book Arts
28 W 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY  10001


Curated by Ann Tarantino & Lindsey Lanfried

In the high season of leisure reading and scholastic book challenges, Center for Book Arts presents Summer Reading, an exhibition of works by contemporary artists who take creative approaches to the book, text, and language. In this exhibition, the book is simultaneously complemented and subverted. Artists investigate the tradition of artist’s books as artistic structure, storytelling in visual art, the narrative possibilities of language, and the object-ness of book material in circulation. Including prints, sculptures, and works on paper that explore the design and aesthetics of language, this exhibition celebrates the relationship between reading and making. Summer Reading extends beyond the gallery walls to include featured reading lists culled by the artist participants and associated lending lists for all ages, developed with our local partner libraries.

This group exhibition features works by Breanne Trammell, Cassie Tompkins, Colette Fu, Dan Walsh, Diane Samuels, Erik den Breejen, Jill Moser with Charles Bernstein & Major Jackson, Joy Drury Cox, Lenka Clayton, Lesley Dill, Mary Ellen Bartley, Meg Hitchcock, Michael Mandiberg, Shanti Grumbine, Skye Gilkerson, Tauba Auerbach (Diagonal Press), Travis Head, and Ward Shelley.

Information about the exhibition’s limited edition catalog can be found here.

Launch F18 Magazine: Joy Drury Cox & Erika Mahr in Conversation

In the spring of 2020 Joy Drury Cox, Erika Mahr and Sam Trioli began a conversation that casually carried on throughout the course of nearly a year.  Weaving in and out a multitude of events in life and the world at large, the conversation between the three of them captured a moment not only within their own artwork, but the meaning of that work in this moment in time. 

Read the conversation in full here.

Faculty member Lien Truong solo show at Davidson College Art Galleries

August 27, 2021

Congratulations to Associate Professor Liên Trương on her solo painting show at Davidson Art Galleries, open through October 3, 2021. 

From the Earth Rise Radiant Beings


Van Every Gallery
On View: August 23, 2021— October 03, 2021
Opening Reception: September 9, 2021, 7:00 pm— 8:30 pm

Related Programs & Events

Liên Trương: Artist Talk
September 9, 2021, 6:00 pm—7:00 pm
EVENT DETAILS

 

Liên Trương: From the Earth Rise Radiant Beings presents recent works by Trương that examine, illuminate, and interrogate notions of heritage and the influences that form belief systems. Exploring these artworks in the current moment—a year and a half marked by illness, death, anxiety, isolation, division, and increasing racial injustices, including recent attacks on Asians, Asian Americans, and Pacific Islanders—adds another dimension to an already physically and conceptually layered artistic practice tied up in social, cultural, and political histories.

The exhibition presents works from several different series and demonstrates Trương’s ability to expertly weave together various references. The Sky is Not Sacred is a two-part collaboration between Hồng-An Trương and Liên Trương. In the large-scale oil triptych on Arches paper, the red-hued sky, storm clouds, and choppy sea may bring an old adage to mind: “Red sky at night, sailors’ delight; red sky in morning, sailors take warning.” Predating meteorology, the saying is just one of many rhymes, stories, and axioms that combines folklore and science in order to make sense of weather phenomena. A red sky in the morning often indicates high water content in the atmosphere, thus, rain ahead.

The artists are not interested in meteorology per se, but rather in the aesthetic theories and ideologies communicated through the genre of landscape painting. In the related video of the same title, the artists examine clouds and stormy weather in various ways, including as a device of British painter John Constable, known for his extensive study of clouds and the sky, which he believed to be “the chief Organ of sentiment” present across the genre of landscape painting. The Sky is Not Sacred also upends the notion of the sky as a divine space. The two artists instead position the sky as a place of potential disaster and war. In particular, the work highlights weather control techniques used during the American War in Vietnam between March 20, 1967, and July 5, 1972. The United States Air Force used cloud-seeding technology to extend the monsoon season to “make mud, not war,” impeding the transport of North Vietnamese troops and supplies.

Trương’s miniature oil painting series, Translatio Imperii, further positions the sky as a place of war and terror. The title refers to a concept dating from the Middle Ages that espouses a linear succession of dominant civilizations whose power and political legitimacy can be traced back to classical antiquity.

Mounted in ornate vintage frames, the paintings feature idyllic landscapes reminiscent of works by Hudson River School painters who found inspiration in the expansive, untamed American landscape of the mid-19th century. Artists like Thomas Cole and Albert Bierstadt portrayed nature as both awe-inspiring and superable. The title of the series inextricably links the Hudson River School painters to the concept of Manifest Destiny, but Trương’s subject matter—the sites of U.S. military bombings—pushes beyond the confines of American borders and speaks to wider U.S. imperialist strategies. Brass title plates denote specific countries and years of the bombings.

Trương’s landscapes are revealed within painted gestures taken directly from Roy Lichtenstein’s Brushstrokes series, which acknowledges another influential art movement, American Abstract Expressionism. That movement, which came to prominence nearly one hundred years after the Hudson River School, was endorsed by the Central Intelligence Agency during the Cold War in direct opposition to Soviet-sponsored Socialist Realism, thereby promoting American modern art as evidence of U.S. cultural superiority. The deliberate small scale of these paintings represents a questioning both the Western art historical canon to U.S. military dominance.

Trương aims to create a type of Asian Futurism through narratives that simultaneously refer to, reject, and reframe oppressive epistemologies. In her earlier paintings, Trương focused more on landscape, gesture, and materiality, while more recent works incorporate representations of the body.

Both of Trương’s parents spent their youth in Vietnam, under the rule of French Indochina. The landscape in According to the Spectre of Blood and Water is of Đà Lạt, Trương’s mother’s birthplace. Trương’s process—fracturing, combining, and layering the landscape with a mix of canonical Western and Asian paintings techniques, antique Japanese fabrics, painted silk, and, in this particular work, painting of French Monarchs—ties in with her concept, especially the complexity and confusion of identity and heritage, further complicated by war and colonization.[1] Juxtaposing Western and Asian painting techniques, materials, and philosophies also questions the hierarchy of the former over the latter within the art historical canon.

Trương’s incorporation of silk and historical textile designs highlights the worldwide textile trade, a centuries-old, entangled narrative of colonization, migration, and power. But her interest in utilizing textiles, particularly Vietnamese silks such as the kind treasured, worn, and collected by her mother, aunts, and cousins, is also a powerful personal rejection of Orientalist ideologies associated with these materials, particularly those of a sexualized or fetishized nature. Trương notes, “We need to consider that skin, cloth, and ornament can only become interrelated metaphors for personhood when actual personhood is ignored and invisible.”

From the Earth Rise Radiant Beings, from Trương’s newest series of the same name, features landscape imagery of the Philippines. Trương’s focus on the island references the various strategies and acts—moral, ideological, military, and legal—employed by the United States to justify expansion and imperialism. The Philippines became a U.S. territory after the Spanish-American War in 1898. Trương sourced imagery of the locale during World War II, during Japanese occupation and just a few years before independence, to speak to the widespread influence of American policies as related to colonialism, immigration, and citizenship.[2]

While landscape is still a key element of her new works, Trương has shifted her focus to include more figurative elements and, in some cases, depictions of specific people. For example, in From the Earth Rise Radiant Beings, Trương includes the likeness of Teresa Magbanua y Ferraris, a resistance fighter who led troops into battle against the country’s successive colonizers: Spain, the United States, and Japan. Other figures are sourced from Orientalist paintings in which women in particular were portrayed as submissive and sexualized. Painted as silhouettes in a pale yellow hue, Trương’s figures, “born from the violent histories descended from Orientalist ideologies, repudiate their origins…transcending geopolitical and generational boundaries to create narratives of resistance and autonomy.”

All of Trương’s works—well-researched, complex narratives that connect a range of influences from historical and military references, textile designs, art history, Asian and Western painting practices, and personal narrative and experiences, speak to perceived representations of culture and the complications of identity, particularly in relationship to colonialism, imperialism, and war. For works that, at heart, are really about transnational and generational trauma and violence, they are remarkably optimistic. Trương helps us imagine new worlds where from our violent past, strength, resistance, autonomy, and love spring forth and help propel us forward.

Trương was born in Vietnam and emigrated to California when she was just eighteen months old. She earned a BFA from Humboldt State University in Arcata, CA, in 1999, and an MFA from Mills College, Oakland, CA, in 2001. Her work has been included in exhibitions at the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, DC; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC; the National Centre for Contemporary Arts, Moscow, Russia; Nha San Collective, Hanoi, Vietnam; and Art Hong Kong; among others. She is the recipient of several awards and honors, including the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant, Whitton Fellowship from the Institute from the Arts and Humanities, and the NC Arts Council Fellowship. Residencies include the Oakland Museum of California and the Marble House Project, Vermont. Truong’s work is in several public collections, including the Linda Lee Alter Collection of Art by Women at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia; DC Collection, Disaphol Chansiri, Chiang Mai, Thailand; North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh; Weatherspoon Art Museum, Greensboro, NC; Cameron Art Museum, Wilmington, NC; and the Post Vidai Collection and Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology, Vietnam.

View the exhibition brochure.

This exhibition and related programs are made possible by the support of the Herb Jackson and Laura Grosch Gallery Endowment and Davidson College Friends of the Arts.

[1] Trương has incorporated fractured paintings of Napoleon III, who made the decision for France to invade Vietnam in 1857, which resulted in more than six decades of French rule over Vietnam.
[2] In developing the Nuremberg Laws, Nazi Germany looked to American tactics such as Jim Crow and the Immigration Act of 1924, which imposed national quotas and barred most Asian people from entering the U.S. Indigenous groups and Filipinos, among others, were designated as non-citizens, even though they were from the U.S. or its territories. Passed in 1935 by the Nazi Party, the Nuremberg Laws stripped citizenship from Germans with three or more Jewish grandparents and reclassified them as “subjects” of the state, among other things.

Faculty member Gesche Wuerfel solo show at Tracey Morgan Gallery, Asheville

June 1, 2021

Gesche Würfel, When Trees Are Dying, June 11 – July 24, 2021, Reception for the Artist by RSVP, Friday, June 11, 6-8pm, Zoom Artist Talk with Gesche Würfel, Dr. Larry Wheeler and Professor Peter White, Thursday, June 17 at 7:00pm.

Gesche Würfel Battle Park, NC (3), version 1, 2019-2020 Solarized and roasted gelatin silver print on glossy RC paper 14h x 11w in 35.56h x 27.94w cm
Gesche Würfel, Battle Park, NC (3), version 1, 2019-2020, Solarized and roasted gelatin silver print on glossy RC paper, 14h x 11w in, 35.56h x 27.94w cm

Tracey Morgan Gallery is pleased to present When Trees are Dying an exhibition of photographs by Gesche Würfel that explore the effects of human-made climate change on forests. This will be Würfel’s first exhibition with the gallery.

“Trees have always been a reassuring presence. The reassurance they provide is partly their continuity. Rooted in place, we may recognize still living trees in the oldest photographs. Further, a tree that lives as long as we humans, 8 decades or at most 10, is deemed, among trees, to be a “short-lived” species. More typical tree lifespans in old-growth forests exceeds three centuries and the oldest trees reach several millennia.

And yet trees now face unprecedented environmental challenges. Each tree species has an evolved optimum set of environmental conditions in which it does the best and each tree species has an evolved range of tolerances for variation in the environment. The problem is not that trees have never seen change before, it is that the magnitude and rate of change in the present time are pushing them to the limits that defines the simple proposition that their ability to turn sunlight into organic matter exceeds the loss of organic matter through the energetic cost of living.

We now know that our species, through increases to the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere, the harvest and fragmentation of forests, and other effects, has produced a rapidly warming world. The effects of that warming are not uniform, but some places are warming faster than others. Artists help us see and interpret the world around us. In When Trees are Dying, Würfel makes climate change effects on trees direct and tangible. In this exhibit she has created a dramatic illustration of climate change by treating trees —through her photo-graphs — with warming, drought, fire, invasive species, increasing salinity and storms.”*

Using 4×5 film and a large format camera, Würfel photographed forests in two U.S. states and climate zones (North Carolina and Massachusetts) to show the impacts of global warming. These impacts include warming, drought, fire, storms, flooding, invasive insects, sea-level rise and saltwater intrusion. Würfel used specific photographic processes to represent each impact. For example she invokes warming through solarized prints in the darkroom; drought with solarized prints roasted in a kiln until they are browned, blistered and sometimes cracked; storms by ripping the solarized prints into several pieces; sea-level rise by mirroring gelatin silver prints; saltwater intrusion by adding sea salt from the North Carolina coast. The resulting photographs are presented as an installation with both color and black and white photographs.

Photography creates a plethora of carbon emissions such as traveling to locations, shipping, supplies such as paper and darkroom chemicals among others. Würfel tried to stay local as much as possible to emit as little carbon as possible. The portion photographed in Massachusetts was taken at the beginning of the project while she was attending a residency at Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art and while a visiting researcher at Harvard Forest in 2019. The carbon emissions created with this project were offset through www.carbonfootprint.com. This project was supported by awards from the Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, the Institute for the Arts & Humanities, and the Department of Art & Art History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Würfel lives and works in Chapel Hill, NC. She holds an MFA in Studio Art from UNC-Chapel Hill, an MA in Photography and Urban Cultures from Goldsmith’s, University of London, UK and a diploma of Spatial Planning from the Technical University Dortmund, Germany. Her work has been exhibited at the Tate Modern, UK; the Contemporary Art Museum, Raleigh, NC; the Nasher Museum of Art, Durham, NC; Goldsmith’s, University of London, UK; Blue Sky Gallery, Portland, OR; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MA, among others. Würfel is the author of Basement Sanctuaries (Schilt Publishing 2014). Her work has appeared in the New York Times, The Guardian, WIRED, Slate, and others. She is a recipient of grants from the German Academic Exchange Services (DAAD), the North Carolina Arts Council, the Puffin Foundation, the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council. Her work is in the collections of MIT Museum, MA and the Portland Museum of Art, OR.

For images and information please email, info@traceymorgangallery.com

Caption: Battle Park, NC (3), version 1, 2019-2020, solarized and burned gelatin silver print on glossy RC pa-per, 14 x 11 inches, unique

*Professor Peter White, excerpt from “Trees and Photography on the Front Lines of Climate Change: A Comment on Gesche Würfel’s When Trees are Dying.”

Faculty member Sabine Gruffat’s Cosmic Rays Film Festival receives NEH Grant

June 1, 2021

The Cosmic Rays Film Festival, in collaboration with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Arts Everywhere initiative, has been approved for a $15,000 Grants for Arts Projects: Media Arts award from the National Endowment of the Arts to support Cosmic Rays Digital. This project is a curated exhibition of extended reality, or XR, media art, including virtual reality, augmented reality, and other forms of immersive media that will take place during the 2022 Cosmic Rays Film Festival, originally founded in 2017 in response to the lack of experimental film and media art programming available to audiences in Chapel Hill and the Triangle. Cosmic Rays Digital is among the more than 1,100 projects across America totaling nearly $27 million that were selected during this second round of Grants for Arts Projects fiscal year 2021 funding.

“This festival has been a labor of love for us these past few years,” said co-founder Sabine Gruffat. “We are thrilled to receive this award from the NEA and to be able to expand the reach of Cosmic Rays through the exciting world of XR film experiences.” Work will be selected from emerging and established media artists working locally, regionally, and internationally with the hopes of creating an intentional community where local and international film and digital media artists and audiences can exchange ideas, knowledge, and networks, and celebrate artistic excellence in digital media. 

“As the country and the arts sector begin to imagine returning to a post-pandemic world, the National Endowment for the Arts is proud to announce funding that will help arts organizations such as the Cosmic Rays Film Festival re-engage fully with partners and audiences,” said NEA Acting Chairman Ann Eilers. “Although the arts have sustained many during the pandemic, the chance to gather with one another and share arts experiences is its own necessity and pleasure. To learn more about the upcoming festival and how to submit, visit cosmicraysfilmfest.com or contact Sabine Gruffat and Bill Brown at contact@cosmicraysfilmfest.com.

About the Cosmic Rays Film Festival
Launched in 2017, the Cosmic Rays Film Festival is an annual celebration of non-commercial experimental short films, live-cinema, and extended reality (VR, AR) projects that takes place in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The festival’s mission is to give audiences in the Triangle region and across the Southeastern U.S. access to work that expands our idea of what media art is and what it can be beyond commercial entertainment. Cosmic Rays is co-directed by Sabine Gruffat and Bill Brown, media artists and professors of art and media production at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

About Arts Everywhere
Arts Everywhere
 is a comprehensive initiative at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to make the arts a fundamental part of the University culture and daily campus life. Built on a model of programming through partnerships, the initiative collaborates with diverse departments, units, and organizations to embed creative expression, live arts experiences, and arts learning into the Carolina experience of students, faculty, staff, and community.

Contact
Sabine Gruffat and Bill Brown, co-directors
contact@cosmicraysfilmfest.com
For more information about the Cosmic Rays Film Festival:
http://www.cosmicraysfilmfest.com

For more information on the projects included in the Arts Endowment grant announcement, visit arts.gov/news.

Cosmic Rays Film Festival Logo
Arts Everywhere Logo
NEH Logo

Congratulations to Assistant Professor Maggie Cao, who will be an NHC Fellow in 2021-2022

April 26, 2021

David G. Frey Assistant Professor Maggie Cao has been named a National Humanities Center Fellow for 2021-2022. She was awarded the Allen W. Clowes Fellowship and Kent R. Mullikin Fellowship to work on her book project Painting and the Making of American Empire‚ 1830–1898. You can read more about the NHC awards here: https://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/national-humanities-center-announces-2021-22-fellows/

Associate Professor Dorothy Verkerk’s book recommended as one of the Five Best Books on Reinterpreting Medieval Art

April 14, 2021

The website Five Books recently published a review by Marc Michael Epstein highlighting Dorothy Verkerk’s book Early Medieval Bible Illumination and the Ashburnham Pentateuch as one of the five best books on reinterpreting medieval art. You can read the full review here: https://fivebooks.com/best-books/reinterpreting-medieval-art-marc-michael-epstein/. Verkerk’s book is innovative, Epstein says, because her “brilliant analysis -. . . says that one can read across the page chiasmically, like an ‘X’. Or one can skip and go back.  In other words, it seems that the reading of images is not necessarily linear, sequential and chronological.” Congratulations Dorothy!