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Cosmic Rays Film Festival adds local exhibition at Peel Gallery

February 8, 2022

EVERYWARE: COSMIC RAYS DIGITAL
March 1-April 2nd, 2022
Peel Gallery
708 West Rosemary Street 
Carrboro, NC 27510
https://www.peel.gallery
https://cosmicraysfilmfest.com
Opening Hours Wednesday – Sunday 12-5pm
Closing reception: Saturday April 2nd, 2022 6pm-8pm

Artists:
Bassam Al-Sabah
Joelle Dietrick and Owen Mundy
Matthew Gantt
Claudia Hart
Jason Isolini
Shasti O’Leary Soudant 
Elly Vadseth & Boris Kourtoukov 
Richard Michael Haley 
Kristin Lucas

Live Audiovisual Performances:
Brent Coughenour
Governance (Quran Karriem and Rebecca Uliasz)

EVERYWARE: COSMIC RAYS DIGITAL is a selection of Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), and interactive artworks by national, international, and North Carolina-based artists who critically engage with the new media technologies that surround us while investigating digital forms of privacy, identity, and nature.

“The Triangle is a growing technology hub and our region’s cultural art offerings should reflect the impact of emerging media technologies.”
– Sabine Gruffat

COSMIC RAYS DIGITAL celebrates artists working with emerging digital media technologies. It is a brand-new programming initiative of the COSMIC RAYS FILM FESTIVAL which is co-directed by local artists and filmmakers Sabine Gruffat and Bill Brown, and will take place from March 31st – April 2nd, 2022.

For more information, please visit www.cosmicraysfilmfest.com.

Press Inquiries:
For more information please contact:
Bill Brown and Sabine Gruffat
contact@cosmicraysfilmfest.com

Faculty member Sabine Gruffat’s film screening at transmediale 2021-2022

January 18, 2022

Sabine Gruffat’s film “Moving or Being Moved” is screening as part of Transmediale at the Haus Der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin.

Transmediale Symposium

2022, Jan 28, Fri — 2022, Jan 29, Sat

What is the potential of refusal? What role do belief and compromise play in postures and acts of refusal? At a two-day symposium, transmediale 2021–22 explores the topic with an interdisciplinary program of lectures, panel discussions, performances and film screenings. Entitled for refusal, this festival edition of transmediale has progressed over the course of a year since January 2021. Together with the exhibition abandon all hope ye who enter here at the Akademie der Künste, the symposium at HKW forms the final part of the festival and, starting out from refusal as generative space, develops a pragmatic confrontation with its impossibilities. 

With AM Kanngieser, Antonia Hernández, Bassam El Baroni, Bassem Saad, Cassie Thornton, Cindy Kaiying Lin, Che Applewhaite, Distributed Cognition Cooperative (Anna Engelhardt, Sasha Shestakova), Donal Lally, Effi & Amir, Katerina Suvorova, Magda Tyżlik-Carver, Mary Maggic, Maya Indira Ganesh, Max Haiven, Nishant Shah, Olúfẹ́mi O. Táíwò, Patricia Domínguez and Nicole L’Huillier, Paolo Gerbaudo, Phanuel Antwi, Samir Bhowmik, Sabine Gruffat, Sasha Litvintseva and Beny Wagner, Tatjana Söding, Timothée Parrique, Xenia Chiaramonte, Zach Blas and others

Many Departmental Artists in Latest Nasher Museum Exhibition

January 18, 2022

Congratulations to our faculty (Lien Truong and Renzo Ortega) as well as our many alums (Saba Taj, Antoine Williams, William Paul Thomas, Meg Stein, Sam Hunter, Xiaowei Wu, and Ayla Gizlice) who are in the current show at the Nasher Museum! “Reckoning and Resilience: North Carolina Art Now” runs from January 13-July 10, 2022, so you have plenty of time to go see their work. You can get more information at the Nashers’ Exhibition Website.

Faculty member Sabine Gruffat’s videos part of Illuminate Raleigh Art Walk

December 1, 2021

Downtown Raleigh comes to light again this year with Illuminate Art Walk presented by Wake Tech. Parts of Downtown Raleigh’s Fayetteville Street and Glenwood South districts transform with large-scale, interactive and light-based art pieces that are unique and family-friendly. A highlight of this year’s month-long event is Chimes presented by Opendoor, an internationally recognized art piece that has traveled globally. Chimes will take over half of City Plaza in the heart of Downtown Raleigh. Installations shine nightly from December 3 to January 7. The art walk is free to the public and self-guided.

Sabine Gruffat has two videos included in the art walk, “Mountain” and “Amarillo Ramp” (with Bill Brown). You can find more information about them, as well as see the map of the art walk on the Illuminate Raleigh website.

Faculty member Jim Hirschfield public sculpture dedicated in Odessa, TX

November 30, 2021

In collaboration with Odessa Arts, First Basin Credit Union recently presented a new public art sculpture making its home at their headquarters in Odessa.

The formal dedication ceremony for the “Hadley Cell” art sculpture, designed and created by North Carolina artists Jim Hirschfield and Sonya Ishii, will be on display publicly and was lit for the first time on Nov. 18.

The commissioned work which was awarded in 2019 was selected from more than 100 artist submissions across the U.S.

The Hadley Cell sculpture consists of a 35’ vertical-column containing five graceful polyhedrons, or cells, extending 8’ at their widest point. The symbol of five stacked cells emulates a column of wind known as The Hadley Cell named after George Hadley. The Hadley Cell is a global scale tropical atmospheric circulation that features air rising near the equator, flowing poleward at a height of 10 to 15 kilometers above the earth’s surface, descending in the subtropics, and then returning equatorward near the surface. Hadley cells exist on either side of the equator. Each cell encircles the globe latitudinally and acts to transport energy from the equator to about the 30th latitude. At the latitudes of the tropics (30° – 35°) the once heated air cools and subsequently descends. Research revealed that Odessa, Texas is located at 31.8457° N and 102.3676° W in the area otherwise known as the horse latitudes.

The column transitions from green that imitates the shrubbery at ground level to blue meant to match the Odessa sky, it is noticeably see through the columns more ephemeral planer surfaces, embodying the sensation of wind. Observers can hear a relaxing hum of the wind gracefully moving through the stainless-steel wire panels purposefully used to give a transparent quality to the work. The transparent mesh exists to further enhance the calming presence of the always moving West Texas wind.

Hirschfield and Ishii have worked as a team for three decades, and as a team they have created a number of major public works of art.

Hirschfield teaches sculpture at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill where he was Department Chair of the Art Department for seven years. He has received a number of major grants and fellowships from both public and private foundations, including awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, the North Carolina Arts Council, the Graham Foundation, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, Art Matters, and the Rockefeller Foundation. He has also exhibited nationally. Jim has had a long interest and history in public art, and had served as a member of the Public Art Network Advisory Council for six years. He also as authored or co-authored five public art master plans.

Sonya Ishii is as an artist who after studying art and then architecture, began working as an artist on one of the very early collaborative team transit projects in Seattle Washington. She too has received a number of awards, including two North Carolina Artist Fellowships. Together Jim and Sonya have created a variety of public art projects ranging from freestanding sculpture to sculptural environments. Together they have completed over 50 Public Art Commissions across the US and Canada that stretch from Seattle Washington to Fort Lauderdale Florida, and from Orono, Maine to Phoenix, Arizona, including five separate projects in the great state of Texas.

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Faculty member Joy Drury Cox in Group Show in Berlin

November 30, 2021

Inside Outside

19.11.2021 – 08.01.2022Vernissage 19.11.2021, 18:00

The occasion for this exhibition was an envelope that we received from France a few months ago. The sender did not give his name. The envelope contained 10 family photos, each pasted facedown with double-sided tape on white cardboards, and a small note with the following text:

«I have no talent for any artistic activity. Talent precedes the need to create. Without it, there is no satisfaction. Everything I started was abruptly stopped by the mediocrity of the draft and immediately destroyed, like a drawer that can only be opened from the inside. I recently attached the front of some old family photos to white cardboard with double-sided tape. Thus, only the pink paper remnants could be seen on the back of these photos. My mother detached them from two different albums and I inherited them after her death. These upturned photos are the sum of my failure. You will find them in this envelope.»Press text

Galerie aKonzeptNiebuhrstraße 510629 BerlinÖffnungszeiten:Di – Fr 15–18 UhrSa 14–19 Uhr+493022452703info@galerieakonzept.com www.galerieakonzept.comwww.raphael-levy.com 

SAMple Gallery Show

November 22, 2021

SAMA is BACK! Starting at SQUARE ONE in SAMple gallery, UNC Studio Art Majors’ Association is hosting our re-inaugural show with a survey of works from our members in our second-floor gallery space. Come to our opening, November 29 from 6-8 pm, and be sure to check it out! 

Follow @samplegallery_unc on Instagram for updates.

Questions? Email sarafris@live.unc.edu.

Square One art exhibition, opening November 11, 2021 from 6-8 pm, Sample Gallery, Hanes Art Center Second Floor

New artwork by Lashayla Stephens in the Alumni Sculpture Garden

November 2, 2021

We have another new artwork in the Alumni Sculpture Garden to celebrate! Come by the Hanes Art Center to see Lashayla Stephens’ Liquid Sunshine (2021). Lashayla says the inspiration for the piece comes from her childhood curiousity, and the iridescent and fluid ranbow spots she would find on the ground after it rained. Nicknamed “liquid sunshine,” the spots are a result of rain mixing with vehicle oil. Her sculpture garden work explores the mix of the beautiful and the disruptive, imagining a larger-scale oil spill in a sensitive environment.

Lashayla Stephens, Liquid Sunshine, 2021
Lashayla Stephens, Liquid Sunshine, 2021, polyurethane foam on concrete with clay butterflies