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PhD Candidate Miranda Elston awarded Cerae Essay Prize

October 8, 2019

Congratulations to PhD Candidate Miranda Elston, who was recently awarded the Cerae: An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies Essay Prize for best essay in Volume 5: Representations and the Recollection of Empire, for her essay “‘Holy Things:’ Dürer’s ‘Feast of the Rosary’ in the Rudolfine Court.”

PHD ccandidate Carlee Forbes appointed Mellon Curatorial Fellow at Fowler Museum-UCLA

October 7, 2019

PhD candidate Carlee Forbes was recently appointed as the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow at the Fowler Museum at UCLA. This multi-year collaborative project will bring together curatorial, conservation, and archival research to explore the museum’s collection of objects donated by the Wellcome Trust in 1965. Sir Henry Wellcome was an American-born British pharmaceutical entrepreneur who used his vast fortune to collect objects from all over the world. When he died, his trust dispersed more than a million objects to various museum collections. The objects now held at the Folwer museum cover a range of provenances, materials, and styles. You can follow Carlee’s progress via weekly #WellcomeWednesdays and #FridayFinds posts to the Fowler’s Instagram (@FowlerMuseum)

PhD Candidate Jennifer Wu awarded grant to attend Summer Institute for Technical Studies in Art (SITSA) at Harvard Art Museums

July 17, 2019

Congratulations to PhD Candidate Jennifer Wu, who was awarded a grant to attend the Summer Institute for Technical Studies in Art (SITSA) at the Harvard Art Museums. Along with a cohort of doctoral students in art history, she received object-based training on conservation and technical analyses as well as hands-on experiences with various artistic materials and techniques. The two-week program emphasized interdisciplinary collaboration with conservators, curators, scientists, artists, and art historians in discussions on art-technical history.

Morrison Art Studio Opening a Success!

October 17, 2018

Fulfilling Chancellor Folt’s expansive vision for the arts, and in partnership with our wonderful colleagues in Arts Everywhere and Carolina Housing, we hatched our pilot “intramural” arts studio last week. Thank you so much for the various ways you have supported the Morrison Art Studio so far. We have heard incredible excitement from the UNC community regarding the 24/7 access and the no-cost supplies, and only anticipate those numbers to continue growing.

Over the course of the past week alone, we:

  • welcomed nearly 500 unique students and campus community members to the studio for a visit;
  • signed up nearly 350 unique students and campus community members to our studio listserv;
  • led 14 group orientation sessions;
  • trained and provided 24/7 access through Housing to 160 students and campus community members!!
  • and we are busy planning more sessions and gatherings to continue to bring this opportunity to more and more students and campus community members.

Approximately half of those who have been oriented live in Morrison dorm, with additional usage by students living in most South Campus dorms.

Thanks again to Assistant Professor Lien Truong and Department Chair Carol Magee in Art and Art History, to Allan Blattner and his entire team in Carolina Housing, and to UNC facilities for their leadership, efforts, and enthusiasm. The Morrison Art Studio is the perfect example of strategic partnership at work.

Please feel free to stop by.  We are continuing the studio’s “open door” policy over the next week.  The studio will be during the staffed hours below either by our Artist-in-Residence, first-year MFA studio art student Natalie Strait or two work-study students hired by the Art and Art History department who will be serving as Assistant Studio Managers. Their names are Eden Teichman and Meghan Mcguire, sophomore and first-year students respectively who are already doing a wonderful job of giving orientations and learning the ropes of studio management!

Monday 4 – 9 pm

Tuesday 5:30 – 10 pm

Wednesday 5:30 – 10 pm

Thursday 5:30 – 10 pm

Huge thanks to Haley Smyser who singlehandedly managed the launch event with grace and skill!

New Publication from PhD Candidate Ashley Bruckbauer

July 31, 2018

Congratulations to PhD candidate Ashley Bruckbauer, whose essay “Ambassadors à la turque: Assimilation and Dissimulation in Eighteenth-Century Images of French-Ottoman Diplomacy” was recently published in Tara Zanardi and Lynda Klich, eds., Visual Typologies from the Early Modern to the Contemporary: Local Contexts and Global Practices (New York: Routledge, 2019).

Abstract:

Fashion played an essential role in the performance of cultural and political identities in eighteenth-century France. This was especially true in diplomatic exchanges and depictions of diplomatic figures, who represented their king and country abroad. Cultural cross-dressing, or the assumption of foreign attire, complicated this function of costume, however. While art historians have examined cultural cross-dressing in eighteenth-century aristocratic portraiture and representations of masked balls, the ambassador has remained a peripheral figure in studies of the popular phenomenon. This essay situates diplomacy at the center of an analysis of French dressing à la turque, examining paintings of French and Ottoman ambassadors adopting the dress, customs, and accoutrements of their hosts. I analyze how these representations of French-Ottoman diplomacy engage with eighteenth-century diplomatic practices and theories as well as popular conceptions of the ambassador as a social type. Contemporary treatises advised diplomats to act as protean characters, assimilating the manners of their foreign hosts. Simultaneously, critiques of the profession characterized the ambassador’s shape-shifting abilities as signs of his duplicitous nature. I argue that images of diplomacy featuring cultural cross-dressing manifest these contested notions of the ambassador, casting the figure as both a sensitive intermediary and a deceptive performer.