New Publications this summer from Art History Faculty

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It has been a very busy summer for Art Department faculty! Here are just a few of the new publications from Art History faculty since May:

In June, Cary Levine’s Pay for Your Pleasures was released by the University of Chicago Press. Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, and Raymond Pettibon—these Southern California artists formed a “bad boy” trifecta. Early purveyors of abject art, the trio produced work ranging from sculptures of feces to copulating stuffed animals, and gained notoriety from being perverse. Showing how their work rethinks transgressive art practices in the wake of the 1960s, Pay for Your Pleasures argues that their collaborations as well as their individual enterprises make them among the most compelling artists in the Los Angeles area in recent years.

Cary Levine, Pay For Your Pleasures: Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, Raymond Pettibon

In July, a volume co-edited by Daniel Sherman, The Long 1968, was published by Indiana University Press. From the mid-1960s to the early 1970s, revolutions in theory, politics, and cultural experimentation swept around the world. These changes had as great a transformative impact on the right as on the left. A touchstone for activists, artists, and theorists of all stripes, the year 1968 has taken on new significance for the present moment, which bears certain uncanny resemblances to that time. The Long 1968 explores the wide-ranging impact of the year and its aftermath in politics, theory, the arts, and international relations—and its uses today.

The Long 1968

And in August, Glaire Anderson’s The Islamic Villa in Early Medieval Iberia arrived from Ashgate. Exploring the aristocratic villas and court culture of Córdoba, during its ‘golden age’ under the reign of the Umayyad dynasty (r. 756-1031 AD), this study illuminates a key facet of the secular architecture of the court and its relationship to the well-known Umayyad luxury arts. Based on textual and archaeological evidence, it offers a detailed analysis of the estates’ architecture and gardens within a synthetic socio-historical framework.

The Islamic Villa In Early Medieval Iberia